Quote of the Week

“Enjoyment is not a goal, it is a feeling that accompanies important ongoing activity.”  — Paul Goodman

 

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Quote of the Week

Honoring our Veterans…

Thanks to the Veterans.

Thanks to the Veterans. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Honoring our Veterans…and keeping these words in mind:

“When our perils are past, shall our gratitude sleep?”  –George Canning

“This nation will remain the land of the free only so long as it is the home of the brave.”  –Elmer Davis

“I think there is one higher office than president and I would call that patriot.”  –Gary Hart

“Freedom is never free.”  –Author Unknown

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”  –John Fitzgerald Kennedy

“We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude.”  –Cynthia Ozick

“It is easy to take liberty for granted, when you have never had it taken from you.”  –Author unknown

“In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned.  When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot.”  –Mark Twain

“You know the thing about heroes?  They don’t brag.”  –John McCain

“My heroes are those who risk their lives every day to protect our world and make it a better place–police, firefighters, and members of our armed forces.”  –Sidney Sheldon

 

2012 Presidential Election…a word from George Washington

With the 2012 presidential election now completed, I remind you of the words of George Washington from his farewell address:

George Washington

George Washington (Photo credit: Joye~)

In contemplating the causes which may disturb our union it occurs as matter of serious concern that any ground should have been furnished for characterizing parties by geographical discriminations – Northern and Southern, Atlantic and Western – whence designing men may endeavor to excite a belief that there is a real difference of local interests and views. One of the expedients of party to acquire influence within particular districts is to misrepresent the opinions and aims of other districts. You can not shield yourselves too much against the jealousies and heartburnings which spring from these misrepresentations; they tend to render alien to each other those who ought to be bound together by fraternal affection….

I have already intimated to you the danger of parties in the state, with particular reference to the founding of them on geographical discriminations. Let me now take a more comprehensive view, and warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party generally.

This spirit, unfortunately, is inseparable from our nature, having its root in the strongest passions of the human mind. It exists under different shapes in all governments, more or less stifled, controlled, or repressed; but in those of the popular form it is seen in its greatest rankness and is truly their worst enemy…

It serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with illfounded jealousies and false alarms; kindles the animosity of one part against another; foments occasionally riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption, which find a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passion. Thus the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another…

Thank you, George Washington for your knowledge and wisdom. 1796 to 2012…216 years later and I hope we will soon learn.